Category: Job Oppurtunities


           Rag-2-Riches !!!
A Real Slum Dog Millionaire !!!

A man from MANNARKOIL of Thirunelveli Dt, is now a renouned Entrepreneur in UNITED STATES!!!

Here is the rags to riches
story of an extremely talented boy from a small village in Tamil Nadu who has risen to be the chief executive officer of a company in Seattle, USA.

It is also the story of how Kalyana Raman Srinivasan, who was so indigent that he had to study under a streetlight, but then managed to score excellent marks, rose in life and became today’s Kal Raman.
At every turn in his life, he took the difficult path and it turned out to be the right one and in the right direction. His rise to the top is more dramatic than a thriller. Today, he is a very successful entrepreneur and the founder-CEO of GlobalScholar.

Kalyana Raman Srinivasan To Kal Raman

Difficult childhood:


       Kal Raman was born and brought up in a small village called Mannarakoil in Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu. It was a comfortable normal middle class life for him and his siblings as his father was a Tahasildar there.
But the sudden death of his father at the age of 45 changed everything overnight.
Kal was 15 then. “My mother got a pension of Rs 420 a month and you can imagine how tough it is to educate four children and feed five mouths with Rs 420?”
Hi life changed dramatically after his father’s death. The family moved from the rented house to a hut that had no proper water supply or electricity. Kal Raman remembers, “All of us used to study under the streetlight and, thank god, the streetlights used to work those days! MGR (M G Ramachandran) was the chief minister then. We had to sell the plates to buy rice to eat and my mother used to give us rice in our hands. That bad was our situation.”
But his mother, who had studied till the 8th standard, was very particular that her children studied. “All our relatives wanted my elder brother to stop studying and take up the small job offered by the government but my mother wanted him to continue studying.”
“Then they wanted me to learn typewriting and shorthand so that I could get some job after the 10th  standard. But mother said, ‘My children are going to get the best education I can offer. Education is our salvation.’ She was my hero for her vision and she still is my hero.”
What kept the family going? “We were sad but because we accepted our fate, we were at peace with whatever that happened to us. We knew our father would not come back to lift us up from poverty. We also knew our salvation was a long way away.”
He didn’t know why he used to tell his mother, “One day I will give you so much money that you will not know what to do with it!” Years later, he did exactly that!
First turning point in life:
Kal Raman believes that God played a hand in all the major turning points in his life. The first turning point in life was after his 12th standard. He got good marks in both the engineering and medicine entrance exams, and for engineering, he got admission at the Anna University in Chennai while for medicine, it was in the Tirunelveli Medical College.
“While going in the bus with my mother to join the medical college, I told her, “If I join for medicine here, the high probability is that my life may begin and end in Tirunelveli. I really want to see the world.’ She agreed with my decision to go to Chennai and join Anna University and study Electrical Engineering and Electronics.”
So, he stepped into a new world outside Tirunelveli, and that was Chennai. Though he had got merit scholarship and a lot of good people helped him pay the initial fee, the scholarship amount never used to reach him regularly or on time.
“The mess fee was Rs 250 a month and I used to be a defaulter in the mess at least six months in a year. Till you pay the mess fee, you cannot eat in the mess. So, I used to live on day scholars’ lunch boxes and also use to fast. That is when I learnt to fast ! I must say a lot of friends helped me with money and food.”
Scarcity of money was so bad that he had no money to buy food just before the final semester exams. When he gave his final semester exams, he had not eaten for a day-and-a-half. “After finishing the exam, I almost fainted.”
The day after the exams came all the scholarship money that was due and it was around Rs 5,000. “So, I went home a rich man and that helped us repay some loans.”

First job:
Like opting for Chennai and joining Anna University instead of a college in Tirunelveli, Kal Raman took another risk with his first job also. His first job was with Tata Consulting Engineers (TCE), and he had a choice of joining either Chennai or Mumbai.
Although he knew nobody in Mumbai, he chose the capital of Maharashtra.
He remembered the first day. “It was interesting. With bag and baggage, I went to the TCE office after taking a shower at the railway station as I had no money to go to any hotel. After the first introduction at the office, the manager noticed that I was wearing slippers to the office. He called me and said, “I don’t care which college you are coming from but this is not acceptable. You should come in shoes tomorrow.”
I said I couldn’t come in shoes the next day and this the manager construed as arrogance. “How could you talk like this?” he asked me. I said, “Sir, it is not that I don’t want to, but I can’t afford to buy shoes. Only after I get my first pay cheque, can I buy shoes. Sir, I request you not to terminate my job because of this. I and my family need this job.”
Shocked to hear the explanation, the manager asked, “Where are you staying?” and the reply was, “Dadar Railway Station.”
So distressed was the manager to hear Kal speak that he immediately released a month’s salary in advance and also arranged for him to be at his friend’s place till he could find a place to stay.
“He bought me a pair of shoes and those were my first shoes. The next day, I sent Rs 1,500 from the advance to my mother.”

From electrical engineering to programming:
Kal’s rise in career was meteoric in a short span of time. Within a month, he got a chance to move to Bengaluru (then Bangalore) and also to programming.
Soon, he was in Chennai with Tata Consultancy Services (TCS). Within a few months, he was sent to Edinburgh, UK.
From Edinburgh, his next stop was the United States. In 1992, he went to the US as an entry level contractor with Wal-Mart. In two years, he was a director running a division.
When he left Wal-Mart after six years, he was a man running the information systems for the International Division of the retail giant.
In 1998, he joined drugstore.com Online Pharmacy as the chief information officer and in 2001 at the age of 30, he was the CEO of the company.
He was at the right place at the right time. “God was there at every step guiding me to take the right decisions. I was also willing to take risks and tread new paths,” Kal says.

Starting GlobalScholar:
Philanthropist Mike Milken who had donated more than a billion dollars to education, wanted to use technology so that high quality education was accessible to ordinary people.
Milken convinced Kal to join him. That was the time Kal was building schools in his village for poor students.
In October 2007, GlobalScholar was launched targetting both teachers and students by acquiring four companies — National Scholar (USA), Classof1 (India), Excelsior (USA), and Ex-Logica (USA) — that were into education.
“Three months after the launch, I travelled all over the US, India, Singapore and China talking to teachers and companies and the public. I found that the only way to impact education was by impressing teachers. The biggest scarcity in the world is good teachers. We decided to help teachers with teaching practices and kids, learning practices.”

Kal Raman decided to concentrate on the US market as the US is more advanced in using technology. “They are also willing to pay money for technology. At present, schools buy the material which can be used by teachers, students and parents.”
Today, they have 200 people working for GlobalScholar in Chennai and 150 in the US. The study material is prepared in the Chennai office.
The company that was started with $50 million will have in excess of $32 million and will generate $5 million of profits. In 2008, the turnover of the company was Rs 40 crore (Rs 400 million) and in 2009, it was Rs 80 crore (Rs 800 million). In the current year it will be 150-160 crore (Rs 1.5-1.6 billion).
“GlobalScholar is growing at 200 per cent every year. We have 1,000 schools and 10 million students, which is one out of 10 kids in the US, using our study material. This is almost 18 per cent of the US population. We are the fastest growing education company in the US.”
GlobalScholar will soon introduce a pilot project in India and China. In the course of all this, Kalyana Raman became Kal Raman. “The country gave me everything and took half my name.”

Giving back to society:
Kal Raman is in India now for the Kumbhabhishekam of the temple at his village Mannarkoil. “It is taking place after 500 years. It is the culmination of two-and-a-half years of work. I have spent more than one and a half crore rupees (Rs 15 million) to renovate the temple and do the Kumbhabhishekam. More than anything else, I have given jobs to all my friends in the village who are masons and carpenters.”
Other than this, he has also adopted all the orphanages around his village and he takes care of around 2,000 kids, some of whom are physically handicapped.
“I feel if I can educate these children, eventually we can make a difference in the society. We also help 100 children in their higher education. Around my village, everyone knows that if a kid who studies well cannot afford to pay fees, he has to only come to my house; his education will be taken care of.”
“I do not do this as charity; its my responsibility. I am giving something back to the society that fed me, taught me, and took care of me and gave me hopes. “

Courtesy: Rediff.Com

             After trimming payroll and tightening perks to cope with the economic slowdown last year, software companies are finding that a rising number of engineering and management graduates are transferring their affections to vocations such as manufacturing and banking — a shift that could force tech firms to scramble harder than ever before for talented employees.

For years, college graduates and professionals working in India’s $50 billion (2.3 lakh crore) outsourcing sector moved from one tech firm to another, often getting 20-30 % higher salaries in the bargain. Now, recruitment experts and industry officials say the churn of experienced staff from IT to other sectors has increased by 15-20 % over the past year.

The main reasons, they say, are the perceived job security in the core sector and rising salary levels in manufacturing and telecom companies. Among those who made the switch is Amit Bhargava, 29, who quit his job as business analyst at one of India’s top tech firms last month to join a multinational bank’s technology centre in Pune.
The technology sector has not really lost its sheen, he says, but he wants to build specialist banking skills. “And it is not as prone to export risks,” he adds, referring to his new vocation. Another reason for the shift away from IT companies is that they are now visiting college campuses for recruitment only during the eighth semester of the course, giving an opportunity to firms from other sectors to attract the best talent before them.

Software industry grouping Nasscom asked its members last year to recruit graduating students during their final, eighth semester and not disrupt academic sessions. Until two years ago, top Indian software firms competed aggressively with each other to hire engineering graduates. With the halo around working for a tech company beginning to fade, the competition is getting fiercer.

Infosys Technologies alone plans to hire 36,000 employees in the fiscal to March and its chief executive S Gopalakrishnan has listed the competition for talent as the industry’s top challenge. 

        Well … India is getting back in its IT field in a good way. There are lot of IT companies who are going to increase intake of engineers in the forth coming years…

The recruitment front is once again buzzing in Indian IT. After months of budget cutting and so-called rightsizing, hiring seems to be back with vengeance at IT companies. Almost all IT companies have revised their hiring targets.

As the companies announce their first quarterly results, we take stock of their hiring in the fiscal year 2009-10. IT industry body Nasscom has released its annual list of Top 20 IT-BPO Employers in India during the year.

Here’s over to the biggest Indian IT/BPO employers during fiscal 2009-10.

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TCS:

Little surprising that topping the list of biggest IT employers in India is the country’s numero uno IT services company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS).

Backed by a robust financial performance in the first quarter (April-May-June), TCS has raised its hiring target. The company now plans to hire 40,000 this year, higher than the around 30,000 it had projected earlier this year.
       The company in the Q1 added a net 3,271 employees, raising its total strength to 163,700.
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 INFOSYS Technologies:

Next on the list is the country’s second biggest software exporter Infosys Technologies. At the end of June 2010, the company and its subsidiaries had 114,822 employees as against 103,905 a year ago and 113,796 at the end of fourth quarter (Jan-March).

During the first quarter 7,833 employees quit Infosys for various reasons, including involuntary attrition. The gross addition during the first quarter was 8,859 people, while the net addition was 1,026 only. The attrition rate in Infosys shot up to a whopping 16 per cent during the quarter (April-June).

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Wipro:
 At no. 3 is the India’s third-largest software services exporter Wipro Technologies. During the June quarter, the company added 4,854 employees taking the total headcount to 1.12 lakhs.

The company also announced that it plans to add as many as 20,000 employees in the next three years. In the month of Feb, the company gave a pay hike in the 8%-12% range with some even getting a 15% increase.

However, like its peers, Wipro too suffered high attrition rate during the quarter. The attrition rate at Wipro jumped to 15.8 per cent during the first quarter (April-June) of this fiscal (2010-11) from 9.8 per cent in like period year ago (2009-10) and 12.1 per cent quarter ago. 


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CTS:
Nasdaq-listed Cognizant Technology Solutions Corporation, a leading provider of information technology, consulting, and BPO services, ranks at no. 4 on the list of India’s biggest IT employers. With over 50 global delivery centers, the company has approximately 80,300 employees as on May 4, 2010.

At the recent annual Nasscom HR Summit 2010, R Chandrasekaran, President and Managing Director, Cognizant, said that during 2009, nearly $1.4 million was spent on training activities. The average training period for an existing employee was two weeks.

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 HCL:
Next on the list of biggest IT employers is India’s fifth largest software services exporter HCL Technologies Ltd.

The Noida-based company, which follows a July-June financial year, said that it added 6,428 employees in the June quarter taking its total headcount to 64,557.

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Genpact:

Sixth biggest IT employer on Nasscom’s list is Genpact. As of June 30, 2010, total headcount at Genpact stood at approximately 42,500 employees worldwide, an increase from 37,400 as of June 30, 2009.

The attrition rate for the six months ended June 30, 2010, was 26%, up from 22% for the same period in 2009.

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 Mphasis – An HP Company:
 MphasiS Ltd is at the seventh spot on the country’s biggest IT employers’ list. For the quarter ended 30 April, 2010, the company added net headcount of 1,429 during. The total headcount stood at 37,119 as of 30 April, 2010.

In December 2009, MphasiS gave a recompense bonus of 10% to all its employees. The company replaced its annual salary increment for its staff with a one-time bonus in order to ensure more variability in its employee wage bill.

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Intelenet Global Services:

      Eight biggest IT employer in the country according to the list is Mumbai-based Intelenet Global Services Ltd, a third-party BPO company. One of the largest BPO employers in India, the company has approximately 32,000 employees as of June 2010.

The company recently figured in ‘The Economic Times – Great Place to Work Survey 2010’ at the 20th spot. The survey revealed that the company has made efforts to ensure that along with adequate facilities, work-life balance is also maintained via fun at work concept.

From having a two-week Employee Appreciation Programme where the employees’ families are invited to take part in the activities to having facilities like a gym, diet and nutrition sessions and counsellor onsite, the company places employee happiness on its high list.

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Tech Mahindra:

The 9th biggest IT employer in India is Tech Mahindra. Tech Mahindra is a joint venture between Indian auto major Mahindra & Mahindra and the BT group.

During the first quarter (April-June) of the current fiscal, the company hired 1,743 employees taking its total headcount to 35,267. The company plans to offer salary hikes in the current quarter. However, it said that hikes will hurt its margins.

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Aegis:

At No. 10 is Essar Group’s back office Aegis BPO. With presence in over 42 global locations, the company boasts of strong employee strength of over 39,000. The company is headquartered in Mumbai.

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Capgemini Consulting India PVT Limited:

Next on the Nasscom’s list is Capgemini Consulting India Pvt Ltd. In India, Capgemini has over 20,000 employees working across seven locations in Mumbai, Hyderabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Kolkata, Pune and Delhi.   It has over 90,000 people in North America, Europe, and the Asia Pacific region.

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 WNS Global Services:

At No. 12 is the Nasdaq-listed second biggest BPO firm in India, WNS Global Services.

For the first quarter, the company reported revenues of $150.0 million, up 12.7% from the corresponding quarter last year and down 4.8% sequentially. The company’s global headcount stood at 21,406 as of June 30, 2010.

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Firstsource Solutions:

The 13th largest IT employer in India is Firstsource Solutions Ltd, country’s leading pure-play BPO company.
       As of June 30, 2010, the company had an employee strength of 24,697. For the first quarter, the annualised attrition for offshore (India/ Philippines) was 55.4% compared to 43.5% in Q4 FY2010.
        
          The company has reported a consolidated net profit at Rs 32.1 crore as against Rs 35.6 crore (QoQ). Consolidated net sales declined to Rs 475.9 crore

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 CSC India PVT Limited:

      NYSE-listed Computer Sciences Corp is the 14th largest IT employer in India. India is CSC’s largest world sourcing location outside the US.

      The company reportedly has more than 16,000 employees in India. The US technology services provider has about 92,000 employees globally. For the fourth quarter ended April 2, the company’s net profit declined 32% to $259 million, or $1.66 a share, while revenue rose modestly to $4.24 billion.

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 3i Infotech:

At No. 15 on the Nasscom’s employers list is IT major 3i Infotech. The company has two main lines of businesses — IT solutions (services and products) and transactions services.

The company clocked a 6.8% growth in its Q1 FY11 revenue at Rs 643.37 crore. Currently the company has more than 15,000 employees on its rolls.

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Hinduja Global Solutions:

BPO services provider Hinduja Global Solutions is the 16th largest IT employer in India.

For the quarter and year ended March 31, 2010, the company’s headcount was 15,615 as against 13,913 associates at the start of the quarter and 13,787 as of March 31, 2009. During the fourth quarter, the company started operating through its new centres in Manila in the Philippines and Nagercoil in India. As on March 31, 2010 the company had Rs 6,481.2 million cash & cash equivalents.

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 L&T Infotech:

At No. 17 is the wholly-owned IT subsidiary of Larsen & Toubro, Larsen & Toubro Infotech.

The company offers software solutions and services to companies in banking & financial services, insurance, energy & petrochemicals, manufacturing and telecom sectors.

The company reportedly has employee strength of over 11,500.

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Patni Computer System:

Mumbai-based Patni Computer Systems is the 18th largest IT employer in India. Patni derives major revenues from the US, followed by Europe, West Asia & Africa and Asia-Pacific.

Patni Computer Systems which has posted a 7.9% rise in net profit added 934 employees in the second quarter, taking its staff count to 14,893 at the end of June.

The company’s attrition rate, excluding business process outsourcing workers, surged to 21.5% in the second quarter from 17.7% in January-March and 13.2% a year earlier.

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 Exl Service.com India PVT Limited:

Exl Service, leading provider of outsourcing and transformation services, is 19th biggest IT employer in India. As on March 31, 2010 the company’s India employee strength was over 11,500.

For the year 2010, the company has given a revenue guidance of between $225 million to $230 million.

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Aditya Birla Minacs:

The BPO venture of Aditya Birla group, Aditya Birla Minacs, is at the 20th spot on the biggest employers list.

Last year the company announced its plans to add 3,000 employees in the coming six months. Currently, its employee strength stands at approximately 13,000 based out of various locations in North America, Europe and Asia.

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 Source : Times of India… 
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