Category: iPhone


Some fathers and sons spend their weekends flying kites in the park.

When some dads and sons spend weekends by flying kites, Luke and Max thought differently !!!

Luke Geissbuhler and his 7-year-old son Max thought it might be more fun to send an iPhone and an HD camera into space.

The purpose was simple: to film some of that stuff that is beyond us. So they thought they’d attach their equipment to a weather balloon. Once it’s up there, they figured, the dearth of atmospheric pressure would ultimately burst it and send it back to Earth.

It all seemed very clever but not exactly foolproof.

As Geissbuhler and son say in their video: “It would have to survive 100 mph winds, temperatures of 60 degrees below zero, speeds of over a 150 mph, and the high risk of a water landing.”

Still, the Wright brothers wouldn’t have been put off by such uncertainty, and they never had an iPhone with which they could track the route of their flying craft. So father and son did a little low-altitude testing and then wandered off to the spacecraft-launching mecca that is Newburgh, N.Y., and sent their balloon into the sky.

The camera and the iPhone had been placed inside some handwarmers and, on the appointed day, father and son were their own two-man (with help) Mission Control in the park, as they watched their balloon sail off into the vast above.

Here is the YouTube version of the attempt.

The balloon burst after around 70 minutes. But it managed to record 100 minutes of footage. As if it knew its own way home, it came back to Earth 30 miles from where it had launched, which Geissbuhler attributed to “a quick ascent and two differing wind patterns.”

This is a truly committed father and son partnership, so they searched for their flying machine until they found it “in the dead of night.” Yes, it was 50 feet up a tree, but the iPhone’s GPS and the camera’s external LED light led them to it.

One can only wonder what their self-styled “Brooklyn Space Program” might attempt next. Perhaps a manned (and boyyed) space flight?

Courtesy: cnet.com

One of the reasons why OLED technology is cool is the fact that you can create a semi-transparent OLED screen. We’re not quite sure how useful this technology really is, except for looking through your laptop when everyone thinks you’re looking at it, but imagining a future with a bunch of semi-transparent gadgetry around us somehow fills us with glee.
Samsung has decided to take a step into the future, creating a 14-inch notebook prototype with a semi-transparent screen. When the device is off, the panel is up to 40 percent transparent; the screen casing is made out of transparent plastic, which makes the experience even more seamless.

                             http://www.viddler.com/player/3febfd8b/

       The iPhone is the most successful smartphone ever. Apple CEO Steve Jobs said recently that the company has sold more than 50 million of them — and that was before the iPhone 4 shipped. Because of that popularity, perhaps, some companies feel it’s acceptable to reach into your wallet, take your money and provide absolutely nothing in return.

       Using an iPhone is like taking a holiday to some corrupt country: It may be beautiful and offer simple pleasures, but you’re going to pay bribes to people who shamelessly charge you for what’s free elsewhere. Sure, nearly all cell phone users get charged something for nothing. For example, many carriers charge extra for text messaging, even though SMS messages don’t cost them anything to provide. And some carriers charge that pointless 15-second recorded set of instructions before every voicemail against your minutes.

       But nobody gets ripped off like iPhone users get ripped off. Here are five specific cases where companies charge iPhone users real money, but in return offer nothing.

1. You pay $360 for mobile broadband you don’t use
2. You pay $325 to not use the carrier anymore
3. You pay $18 for committing to a new, two-year contract
4. You pay $240 for the high-end data plan you don’t use
5. You pay full price for apps you don’t use
Source: Computer World